21/xsl/MobileMenu.xsltmobileNave880e1541/WorkArea//http://rsna.org/TwoColumnWireframe.aspx?pageid=8500&ekfxmen_noscript=1&ekfxmensel=falsefalsetruetruetruefalsefalse10-18.0.0.0730truefalse
  •  
     

    • Donate now 


      Focus Foundation Winter 2014


      pdf button

    • FFheader
    • Grant Recipients Research the Benefits of Exercise on Parkinson’s Disease 
      Philips, M.D. Shah, B.S. 
      At RSNA 2012, press conferences were held to highlight research findings that might be particularly interesting to the public. Grant recipient, Chintan Shah, B.S., was chosen to present the work he did with another R&E grantee, Michael D. Phillips, M.D., about the benefits of exercise on Parkinson’s disease.

      The idea for this research originated with Jay L. Alberts, Ph.D., neuroscientist at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute in Cleveland. In 2003, Dr. Alberts rode a tandem bicycle across Iowa alongside a cyclist with Parkinson’s to raise awareness for the disease. The fellow cyclist experienced improvements in her symptoms after the ride.

      “The finding was serendipitous,” Dr. Alberts recalled. “I was pedaling faster than her, which forced her to pedal faster. She had improvements in her upper extremity function, so we started to look at the possible mechanism behind this improved function.” As part of this inquiry, Dr. Alberts, together with principal investigator Dr. Phillips, researcher Mr. Shah, and their Cleveland Clinic colleagues, recently used functional connectivity MR imaging (fcMRI) to study the effect of exercise on 26 patients with Parkinson’s disease.

      “By measuring changes in blood oxygenation levels in the brain, fcMRI allows us to look at the functional connectivity between different brain regions,” Shah said.

      The patients participated in bicycle exercise sessions three times a week for eight weeks. Some patients exercised at a voluntary level and others underwent forced-rate exercise, pedaling at a speed above their voluntary rate. The researchers used a modified exercise bike to induce forced-rate activity.

      “We developed an algorithm to control a motor on the bike and used a controller to sense the patient’s rate of exertion and adjust the motor based on their input,” Dr. Alberts said.

      fcMRI was conducted before and after the eight weeks of exercise therapy and again as follow-up four weeks later. The research team calculated brain activation and connectivity levels from the fc- MRI results and correlated the data with average pedaling rate. Results showed increases in task-related connectivity between the primary motor cortex and the posterior region of the brain’s thalamus. Faster pedaling rate was the key factor related to these improvements, which were still evident at follow-up.

      “The results show that forced-rate bicycle exercise is an effective, low-cost therapy for Parkinson’s disease,” Shah said.
      Dr. Alberts noted that while faster pedaling led to more significant results, not all people with Parkinson’s need to do forced-rate exercise to see improvement.

      “We’re now looking at this phenomenon in patients with exercise bikes in their home,” he said, “and other exercises like swimming and rowing on tandem machines may provide similar benefits.”
        
      Button Home
       

    We appreciate your comments and suggestions in our effort to improve your RSNA web experience.

    Name (required)

     

    Email Address (required)

     

    Comments (required)

     

     

     

     

    Discounted Dues: Eligible North American Countries 
    Belize
    Costa Rica
    Dominican Republic
    El Salvador
    Grenada
    Guatamala
    Haiti
    Honduras
    Jamaica
    Netherlands Antilles
    Nicaragua
    Panama
    St.Lucia
    St. Vincent & Grenadines
    Country    Country    Country 
    Afghanistan   Grenada   Pakistan
    Albania   Guatemala   Papua New Guinea
    Algeria   Guinea   Paraguay
    Angola   Guinea-Bissau   Peru
    Armenia   Guyana   Phillippines
    Azerbaijan   Haiti   Rwanda
    Bangladesh   Honduras   Samoa
    Belarus   India   Sao Tome & Principe
    Belize   Indonesia   Senegal
    Benin   Iran   Serbia
    Bhutan   Iraq   Sierra Leone
    Bolivia   Jordan   Solomon Islands
    Bosnia & Herzegovina   Jamaica   Somalia
    Botswana   Kenya   South Africa
    Bulgaria   Kiribati   South Sudan
    Burkina Faso   Korea, Dem Rep (North)   Sri Lanka
    Burundi   Kosovo   St Lucia
    Cambodia   Kyrgyzstan   St Vincent & Grenadines
    Cameroon   Laos\Lao PDR   Sudan
    Cape Verde   Lesotho   Swaziland
    Central African Republic   Liberia   Syria
    Chad   Macedonia   Tajikistan
    China   Madagascar   Tanzania
    Colombia   Malawi   Thailand
    Comoros   Maldives   Timor-Leste
    Congo, Dem. Rep.   Mali   Togo
    Congo, Republic of   Marshall Islands   Tonga
    Cote d'Ivoire   Mauritania   Tunisia
    Djibouti   Micronesia, Fed. Sts.   Turkmenistan
    Dominica   Moldova   Tuvalu
    Domicican Republic   Mongolia   Uganda
    Ecuador   Montenegro   Ukraine
    Egypt   Morocco   Uzbekistan
    El Salvador   Mozambique   Vanuatu
    Eritrea   Myanmar   Vietnam
    Ethiopia   Namibia   West Bank & Gaza
    Fiji   Nepal   Yemen
    Gambia, The   Nicaragua   Zambia
    Georgia   Niger   Zimbabwe
    Ghana   Nigeria    

    Legacy Collection 2
    Radiology Logo
    RadioGraphics Logo 
    Tier 1

    • Bed count: 1-400
    • Associate College: Community, Technical, Further Education (UK), Tribal College
    • Community Public Library (small scale): general reference public library, museum, non-profit administration office

    Tier 2

    • Bed count: 401-750
    • Baccalaureate College or University: Bachelor's is the highest degree offered
    • Master's College or University: Master's is the highest degree offered
    • Special Focus Institution: theological seminaries, Bible colleges, engineering, technological, business, management, art, music, design, law

    Tier 3

    • Bedcount: 751-1,000
    • Research University: high or very high research activity without affiliated medical school
    • Health Profession School: non-medical, but health focused

    Tier 4

    • Bed count: 1,001 +
    • Medical School: research universities with medical school, including medical centers

    Tier 5

    • Consortia: academic, medical libraries, affiliated hospitals, regional libraries and other networks
    • Corporate
    • Government Agency and Ministry
    • Hospital System
    • Private Practice
    • Research Institute: government and non-government health research
    • State or National Public Library
    • Professional Society: trade unions, industry trade association, lobbying organization